If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.
When it comes down to actually putting yourself out there and creating a profile, all apps ask for the basics: name, age, location, a photo, a short blurb about yourself, and (usually) if you can stand a person who smokes. Beyond that, it can be a bit of a crapshoot. Some apps, like Tinder, value photos over personality. Others, like eharmony, make you fill out an endless questionnaire before you can even think about browsing for your match. Still others, like Zoosk, ask so little that you're left to wonder what's being used to actually match you with like-minded singles.

Instead of the user searching for potential matches using their own criteria, eHarmony presents their suggestions on the lengthy and comprehensive personality quiz members take when signing up. eHarmony caters to people of a variety of age, demographics, and backgrounds, and also has options for local dating. One thing's for sure: people on eHarmony aren't looking for a hook-up. Success stories for eHarmony are shared on the site.

Match is one of the most famous online dating sites, and for good reason. Running since 1995, Match really knows what it's doing in terms of pairing people looking for love and offering an extremely smooth user experience. While many singles these days opt for hookup apps and jumping from fling to fling, for those truly seeking committed relationships, Match is one of the best options for you.


A lot of dating websites and apps advertise the fact that they’re free, but be careful what you’re signing up for. Setting up a profile is always free, but most of the websites we tested offered only some of their matching services free of charge. Many dating websites make you pay to view user photos and send messages.  Apps, on the other hand, are predominantly free. Upgrades are available if you want to use the app’s extra features, but for the most part a free account is all you need.
While not technically an online dating site, Meetup did earn your praise in the nominations round for helping you find great things to do that you're actually interested in, and meet interesting people while you went out to do them. After all, for many of us, it's not meeting people that's the problem, it's meeting people who like the things we like or enjoy the pastimes we do. In that vein, Meetup was one of your favorite ways to meet people in general , and perfect for making friends with others who enjoy the activities you do—and if something develops from there, then all the better. If you're more interested in taking the long road, this is a great approach, especially as you start to be seen hanging out at similar Meetup events in your community.
We created three made-up online dating profiles and spent five days trying out each service and monitoring the responses our fake profiles received. We created a woman seeking a man, a man seeking a woman and a woman seeking a woman to make sure our data was well-rounded. All three profiles were similarly generic: They were white with bachelor’s degrees with low to midrange full-time jobs. To create these accounts we had to make fake email accounts and, for some sites, fake Facebook accounts and phone numbers as well.
Coffee Meets Bagel hopes to offer users better quality matches by sending curated matches, or "Bagels," each day at noon. They suggest ice breakers for first messages and the profiles are more in-depth than Tinder. For people who like a little extra hand-holding, CMB isn't the worst option. However, I felt the app was confusing to use; too many features and too many gimmicks. I shouldn't have to lookup online tutorials to figure out how to use a dating app. And why call matches Bagels?

Who's on Match.com? Your neighbors, coworkers and more. Match.com members form a diverse, global community of singles who share common goals - to meet other singles, find dates, form romantic relationships and meet life partners. Young and old alike, gay and straight, from everywhere around the world, singles come to Match.com to flirt, meet, date, have fun, fall in love and to form meaningful, loving relationships.


The downside of online dating is the lack of face-to-face interaction, at least when you first start chatting with someone. This leaves users vulnerable to chat bots, or computer programs made to trick real users into thinking they’re interacting with a real person. These programs often attempt to steal credit card or other personal information from real people.

Founded in February 2015, The Heart Market is an online matchmaking service that helps users find prospective partners. Their primary platform is hosted on the web, but access to the site is also available on mobile and tablet devices. They strive to make their online dating site as safe as possible by carrying out background checks on all applicants.
When Tinder popularized swiping on dating apps, many clones followed suit. Without a doubt, Bumble was the most successful to copy the formula. Bumble is almost identical to Tinder in its layout and interface, with the main difference being that in a straight couple match women have to message the men first (for same-sex couples there are no messaging restrictions).
Features for introverts: Instead of swiping, browsing, poking, and messaging your way into someone's inbox only to never hear back, this app will send you a potential match every day at noon. Men receive curated matches based on the algorithm and women will only be presented with potential matches (called Bagels) that have already expressed interest. 
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