Since our last round of testing, the dating app Hinge has gained lots of popularity. Founded in 2012, it's similar to Tinder but emphasizes matching you with people you share Facebook friends with. Once you’re out of Facebook connections, you start seeing potential matches you have fewer friends in common with. You're able to see each user's job, educational background, physical traits and a short biography. Scroll through users and select the ones you'd like to get to know better. If that user likes you back, you're connected via the app's messaging platform.
If you think you're too old to exercise your thumb, think again. Millennials aren't the only ones who are dating digitally right now. Studies indicate that there are two major growing demographics when it comes to online dating: people under 25, and people over 50. How come? Well, look no further than marriage statistics, as people on average enter a first marriage around age 28, and given the divorce rate, often become single again later in life. In fact, a recent report indicated that while only 6 percent of Golden Year singles confessed to having online dating profiles in 2013, that number has doubled over the past five years, now teetering around 12 percent and growing. As mobile phones and tablets become more user-friendly for all ages, the barriers that might have once prevented silver bachelors from swiping no longer apply.
Hinge focuses on common connections that you and a potential partner share on Facebook. Which is great if you trust the judgment of your friends and family. Of course, some of us are trying to meet new people, far removed from our everyday lives. (Hinge may have come to understand that, since you no longer need Facebook to sign up.) The app also asks questions to help you match with better connections, which can be a plus for serious relationship seekers. 
Changes in the last year have made OkCupid a bit more like Tinder, focusing more on swiping and eliminating the ability to message a user without matching with them first. You can still send a message -- it just won't show up in the recipient's inbox unless you match. Because who doesn't enjoy sending a thoughtful message to someone who might never see it? However, OkCupid has pointed out that these changes did help lower the number of offensive messages users received, which might be a worthwhile trade-off.

When considering your options, it helps to identify what your intentions are for using an online dating site. If you're not looking to meet your future spouse, you're probably better suited for the adult dating site FriendFinder-X, a place where you can live out your sexual desires and find others looking for the same level of casual commitment. FF-X is a strictly hookup- and casual sex-oriented site that boasts millions of users around the world, so if you're looking to get lucky, your odds are high here.


eHarmony which operates the following site eHarmony.ca is another trusted dating site in Canada. In fact, this site is unique in that it is the only one that uses a scientific approach to match the singles with high compatibility characteristics. In some cases with other traditional dating sites, people often meet with other partners who are not compatible with their interests. Therefore, the good part about this site is that it does all the work for you by narrowing the matches to suit your interests.
‘If you’ve had a great date, let them know. Trying to act aloof by waiting three days after a date to get in touch doesn’t work in today’s age of instant communication. In fact, only 4% of people think you should purposely wait before replying to a message from a date. If you enjoyed the date, don’t be afraid to send them a quick message and let them know that you’d like to see them again.’
The experts say: This site is owned by the dating giant MEETIC and gives you access to 20 million members across Europe and it also merged with Match.com in 2009. A daily email suggests six members you might be interested in, which is a useful feature that doesn’t feel like you’re being bombarded but provides you enough choice to find a compatible date.
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eHarmony was one of the pioneers in the online dating space, and -- while I haven't personally used this one -- we all remember the pitch, thanks to years of TV commercials: The service matches couples based on "29 dimensions" of compatibility (as determined by a thorough relationship questionnaire). While you can review the profiles of your prospective matches for free, you'll need to pay to unlock the full features of the service. But that comes with a guarantee: If, after three months of paid membership and communicating with at least five members, you're not satisfied, eHarmony will refund your money. Despite a rocky road that eventually involved a high-profile lawsuit, the site finally added same-sex dating in 2013, too. I have mixed feelings about using the site myself, but the site is at least technically more inclusive now.
The site has profile verification options to ensure you are matching with real people and not fake profiles. On top of that, the site has a Smart Match system that essentially allows it to learn your preferences the more you use it, and the option to send a “Mega Flirt” that reaches dozens of inboxes every 15 minutes. It's a site you won't easily grow bored of that aims to help you become a better dater. best dating app
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